“Why Do You Call Me a Whore?” Moroccan Rap Artist Soultana

By Re

An audacious advocate for women’s liberation, Moroccan female rap artist Soultana’s percussive beats communicate the disillusionment of many unemployed Moroccans, particularly women who are left prostituting themselves for capital.

“Even if you study, you will not have a job,” Soultana said. “If you are beautiful and sexy [or] if you wear a skirt and make up, they will give you a job.” Prostitution.

The lyrics of “Sawt Nssa,” an anthem released in 2012, which translates to “Women’s Voices,” expound upon a woman’s turning to the streets, articulating the despondency of many unemployed Moroccan women.

“Why do you call me a whore? Do you know how much I suffered? Maybe the money wasn’t enough for me…I thought about money. I thought about life so I chose a life on the street…” read some of the lyrics. “This is the Moroccan woman. This is one of a million,” Soultana sings.

This is 8.1 percent of Morocco, according to World Bank.

Unemployment in Morocco is a prevailing issue with which 95.8 percent of people are concerned, as stated in a press release by the High Commissioner for Planning, and with which many people are still seeking governmental facilitation.

“If I didn’t believe my own raps,” Soultana said, those about making healthy life decisions, “I would consider prostitution,” she admitted. She, like many unemployed Moroccans, has not received aid from the government. “If the government respected artists,” she said, “they would give them a chance to search for jobs—but it is not happening in Morocco.”

The private economy remains just 10 percent of all employment, as stated by World Bank, and thus many Moroccan women are left to find work in the informal economy, risking their living each day.

However, the rap artist acknowledged, “The problem is not just the government. It is us.” Moroccan people need to change their mentality, she said, before they will see substantial change. “Even if we had a lot of money in Morocco, the mentality of the people would not change.”

Her advice, “Go and find something new. This is the change we need.”

For Soultana, she found rap. “Hip Hop in general changes people,” she said. Soultana received the Key Award from the Mawazine Festival in 2008, as a member of Morocco’s first female rap group, Tigresse Flow. Since then, she has been performing solo primarily about women’s issues and challenges faced by her generation.

Because her music is meant to speak to the public, she decided not to sell it for money. “I don’t want to make people pay to hear my lesson,” she said. “We don’t have advice. This is what we need in Morocco.”

Watch the full video here.